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No Procession on the 12th, Montreal, 1877

Montreal Daily Star, 11 July 1877, page 1

No Procession on the 12th

The Orangemen Patriotically Accede to the Request of their Fellow Citizens and Abandon the Procession in the Interest of Peace

A great weight has been lifted off the city by the patriotic conduct of the Orange body in acceding to the request of their fellow citizens, and abandoning , for this year, at least, their intention of walking to the church in procession on the anniversary of the Battle of the Boyne.  This resolution was not arrived at until a few minutes before midnight last night, and the deepest anxiety was manifested by large numbers of citizens who congregated in several places to know the result.  At St Patrick’s Hall the largest gathering with [illegible] and the heads of the Irish Societies were in session until a late hour.  The course that has been pursued reflects honor upon all concerned.  The sp[illegible] of wise concession and forbearance showed by the Orangemen deserve the highest recognition, and the Roman Catholics were among the first last night to acknowledge the spirit of conciliation that was manifested in the resolution arrived at.  Every one looked forward to serious trouble, if not loss of life if the procession took place, and the feeling that was prevailed for some time past in this community has been a profoundly painful one.  Much of the happy result accomplished is owing to the wise and moderate con [illegible] pursued by the leaders of the Irish societies, who suggested and succeeded in getting truly representative meeting yesterday [illegible] all our National Societies. The sensible speeches of those gentlemen, who met in the parlour of the St Lawrence Hall, and notably the observations of the chairman, could not fail to have effect in averting what was looked forward to as a civil war. Our city has been spared scenes of riot and disorder that would have fallen upon her like a nightmare.  Good sense has prevailed, and citizens now look forward to a long continuance of that peace, harmony and good will that should always prevail among a people and by the ties of a common Christianity and citizenship.  The matter has been acquitted in such a form that both sides can co[illegible] shake hands over the result, and no feeling of triumph or defeat be felt on either side.

We stated in last evening’s issue that the meeting in the St Lawrence Hall passed a resolution earnestly among the Orangemen to give up the procession.  This result was communicated to the leaders of the Orange Society by a deputation and a copy of the resolution signed by all the representatives of National Societies, [illegible] added to Colonel Smith and Mr Grant the latter County Master and Chairman [illegible] the mass meeting of Orangemen which was being held in the Orange Hall. These gentlemen promised to lay it before the meeting without delay and return as early as possible with an answer. The signers remained in session awaiting an answer, and the reports from time to time that arrive, up to the last kept up the most painful anxiety to know the result. At 11:45 pm all felt as if they could breath freely, as an advance courier armed with the pleasing news that the resolution was carried (although by a narrow majority) to abandon the idea of  having a procession.  Messrs. Grant and Smith followed soon after as the ambassadors of peace and evidently well pleased to come in that capacity.  The meeting to receive the report took place at once, with Mr Devlin in the chair.  The following is the substance of what occurred.

Mr Grant said there had been a large attendance of the membership of the order, who after discussion had come to a resolution, which had been carried by a small majority, not to make a public demonstration.  The committee would be served with an exact copy of the resolution which had been arrived at. The society reserved their right to march when they pleased, but there would be no procession on the 12th of July this year. The members would proceed to church about half past eleven and trusted that there would be no disturbance or endeavour to hinder them in the charge of their privilege and duty of going to church.

Col Smith said that he had only to say that this decision had been arrived at after earnest deliberation upon the requests of the societies. They had determined to give way but reserved their right to go to church. He trusted the societies would now do their duty and see that the Orangemen were not molested. The society had acted in deference to the wishes of their fellow citizens.

Mr Grant said he ought to state that a deputation from the City Council had this day waited on the Orangemen which had tended in a great measure to influence their decision.

Mr Devlin said it was only necessary for him to say that he congratulated the societies on the result which had been arrived at, which was calculated to sustain and continue the friendly feeling which had existed for years.  He regarded the result, not as a triumph of party, but as a triumph of peace, good will and fellowship, and as such he regarded it.  He would announce the result at another meeting this evening.  All might rest assured that the proceedings throughout had been conducted with good will as tending to the prosperity of the Dominion and of the city of Montreal.

Col Smith said that in light of the society had acted in the interest of peace and good will.

Mr Devlin said he considered the best thanks of the committee and of the citizens generally were due to the gentlemen who had waited upon the committee, and also to all who had cooperated towards this good result. The Irish Catholic societies did not desire to triumph over Protestants, but were actuated by desires for the best interests of the whole country.

Mr Kerry, St George’s Society, said before the meeting separated it ought to thank the gentlemen of the Orange Society present for the interest they had taken in the matter.  He thought a vote of thanks should be passed to them for their kind offices.

Mr McMaster, of the Irish Protestant Benevolent Society, in seconding the motion, said he had no doubt that the gentlemen had made many personal sacrifices for the peace of the city.

Several gentlemen having spoken in this sense.

Col Smith thought that the vote should be passed to the society generally.

Mr Kerry said he should be glad to amend his motion in that sense.

The motion having been carried.

Col Smith, in acknowledging it, said he hoped after all this would be considered brethren.  The meeting adjourned.

St Andrew’s Day, Montreal, 1880

Montreal Daily Star, 1 December 1880, page 1

St Andrew’s Day

Annual Gathering of the Clans – The sermon in Craig Street Church mirth and music at the Windsor

Our Scottish friends were [illegible] at an early hour yesterday, preparing for the proper celebration of the anniversary of their patron saint.  More than one aged wanderer from the

“Land of brown heath and shaggy wood,

Land of the mountain and the good”

Sported the purple heather, and doubtless felt at least two inches taller than on the preceding day.  Why not?

Caledonian Society

The annual meeting of the Caledonian society was held in the lecture room of the Crescent Street Church, at 2 o’clock.  The President, Mr Thos Robins, occupied the chair.

After routine business, it was

Moved by Mr Wm Angus, seconded by Mr James Wright, and unanimously resolved, “That the sum of $100 be donated to the charitable fund of the St Andrew’s Society.”

It was then resolved on motion of Mr P Fulton, seconded by Mr J Wright, “That the President, Mr Thos Robins, and the Secretary, Mr J Hood, be a deputation to present the amount at the St Andrew’s Society meeting.”

St Andrew’s Society

This Society met immediately after the Caledonian Society adjourned, when the installation of officers recently elected tool place.

In reference to a sum of £34 13s 6d Canadian currency, handed to the Society some twenty-five years ago, on the death by drowning of a Scotchman named Gilchrist, it was reported that the amount, with interest, in all, $334.62, has been made over to the heirs of the deceased, who have attained their majority.

The deputation from the Caledonian Society to acquaint the meeting with the resolution of that Society, voting the amount of $100 to the charitable fund of the St Andrew’s Society, was received, and a vote of thanks passed.

The two societies then met and adjourned to the Crescent Street church, where

The Annual Sermon

Was preached by Rev AB Mackay.  The Rev gentleman took as the basis of his address the character of the Apostle Andrew as set forth in St John’s Gospel.  He admitted that it was sometimes difficult to find a suitable subject for a special occasion, but their subject stared them in the face that afternoon; what could be more appropriate at a meeting of St Andrew’s Society on St Andrew’s day than to direct their attention to the character of St Andrew.  There are, he proceeded, a great many traditions about Andrew. He is the patron Saint of Russia as well as of Scotland. But those are mere cobwebs of the dark ages, and we will go back to the fountain head and see what the Bible says about Andrew, and seek to imitate him. There are few characters more worthy of imitation. The first characteristic we notice in him is that he put himself in the way of getting good.  There was a great movement in connection with the preaching of John the Baptist, and amongst those who went to hear the rough preacher was Andrew; who, however, was not like the fickle crowd, but became one of John’s disciples, and stuck to him through thick and thin. The Scotch people as a whole imitate St Andrew in this. They are pre-eminently a Sabbath keeping people. Like Andrew, Scotchmen are noted, all the world over, for their particularity, clinging to the faith which they have inherited from their forefathers. But Andrew did something better than follow John, who was only “a voice crying in the wilderness” a finger post pointing to the Lamb of God.  As John cried “behold the Lamb of God” Andrew left John  and followed Jesus. We should imitate Andrew in this also. A great company of Scotchmen follow Andrew when he merely puts himself in the way of getting good, but that company became much smaller when Andrew follows the Lord Jesus Christ, and takes Him for his Saviour.  Scotchmen are great seekers. Here they are in Canada; they are in India, and all over the world, doing the world’s rough work, and sometimes governing the world, seeking glory and happiness.  Andrew teaches us to seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, when all other things will be added to us.  Jesus had his eye upon Andrew, and when he saw him following Him, He said: “What seek ye!” Andrew answered, “Master, where dwellest thou!” when Jesus gave the wonderful invitation to the fisherman Andrew from the Son of the Highest to dwell with Him, and to get a solution of the difficulties that beset his soul.  Jesus receives every true seeker in like manner today. We have heard of the ,” philosopher who ran through the streets, crying “Eureka, Eureka, I have found it;” but how much more blessed are those who, like Andrew, can say, “We have found the Messiah”.  Then Andrew confessed the truth. Having found the Messiah, he went and told others, and was the honored instrument of bringing his brother, Simon Peter to Christ. The reverend gentleman referred in proud terms to men like Rutherford, Knox, Chalmers, Livingstone and Duff, who had rendered Scotland famous throughout the world.  He alluded in eloquent terms to Scotland’s many glories and precious memories, and concluded by expressing the hope that all the families represented in that Church would meet in unbroken ranks around the throne of God.

The Ball

The annual ball took place at the Windsor Hotel, and was very successful.  Among the company were a number of the officers of the Fifth (Royal Scots) Fusiliers in full Highland uniform, as well as those of some of the other battalions. Shortly after nine o’clock the President of the Society, with the invited guests, preceded by the pipers of the Fifth (Royal Scots) Fusiliers, entered the ball-room, where Terpsichore ruled supreme. The music was provided by Gruenwald’s orchestra, and consisted mostly of a number of favourite Scotch airs. There were present about one hundred and fifty guests. Some of the costumes were particularly striking, and much taste was displayed in all.  An interesting feature in the ball-room was the national dances which were performed very artistically.  Shortly after midnight the supper-room was sought and the menu served in the “Windsor’s” best style. During the supper several toasts were proposed, and afterwards the dancing was resumed and the majority of the fair belles and their gallant Lotharios “danced and danced away” until the “wee sma hours” when they dispersed. The invited guests were: His Worship Mayor Rivard; Edward Rawlings, President St George’s Society, and lady; Thomas Robin, President Caledonian Society; Hon TJ Loranger, President Jean Baptiste Society; FB McNamee, President St Patrick’s Society; John H Mooney, Irish Protestant Benevolent Society; Wm Wilson, St Patrick’s National Society; WC Munderloch, German Societyl; and Mr WJ Ingram of the St Andrew’s Society of New York.

The Day Elsewhere

Quebec – Flags were to-day hoisted on the Parliament House and several of the main buildings, in honor of St Andrew’s Day.  The anniversary sermon of the St Andrew’s Society was preached to-night by Rev Dr Cook.

Toronto- The St Andrew’s Society celebrated the day by a dinner at the Queen’s this evening. There was a large attendance.

Ottawa- St Andrew’s Day was observed by the members of the Society attending services in St Andrew’s Church, whom the annual sermon was preached by the Chaplain of the Society, Rev FW Farries from the 5th and 6th verses of the 137th Psalm.  There was a good turn-out of brethren.  This evening a grand concert in the Opera House is well attended.  At the conclusion of the concert of the officers of the Society were entertained by the President, Mr Sanford Fleming a the Rideau Club.

Halifax- To-day being St Andrew’s Day was a civic holiday.  The North British Society had their annual dinner at the Halifax Hotel to-night about eighty being present, among whom were Lieut-Governor Archibald and Chief Justice Sir William Young.

St John- St Andrew’s Day was observed by a supper at the Park Hotel to-night by St Andrew’s Society, and in like manner by the society at Fredericton, NB.

New York- St Andrew’s Society of the State of New York held their annual dinner to-night at Delmonicos.  Letters of regret were received from the Marquis of Lorne, General Grant, and Sir Edward Thornton, the British Minister.

 

Menu for the St Andrew’s Ball, Montreal, 1912

Montreal Daily Star, 7 December 1912, page 10

St Andrew’s Society Ball

 

Menu

 

Consumme Bellevue

Pate d’Huitres Poulette

Mignon d’Agneau Lavalliere

Pomme Noisette

Scotch Haggis

Buffet Froid

Chiffonnade Salad

Glace Napolitaine

Petite Fours

Cafe

 

Windsor Hotel

6th December 1912

Soiree and Ball of the Caledonian Society, Montreal, 1858

Montreal Gazette, 1 December 1858, page 2

 

The Annual Soiree and Ball of the Caledonian Society, in aid of the funds of the St Andrew’s Home, took place on the evening of St Andrew’s day.  The crowd was not so great as we should liked to have seen, or as the occasion deserved.  The President, AA Stevenson, Esq., occupied the chair, and the representatives of the different National Societies of this city were on the platform.  The President addressed those assembled, giving an account of the different charities which they had administered, and was followed by the Honble John Rose, TD McGee, Esq., MPP, AN Rennie Esq., R H Hamilton, Esq., M Doherty, Esq., C Dorwin, Esq., __ Masson, Esq., and WA Merry, Esq.  After the conclusion of the programme, dancing commenced and was continued till an early hour in the morning.  All enjoyed themselves greatly.  The arrangements were all that could be desired.

St Andrew’s Ball, Montreal, 1912

Montreal Daily Star, 7 December 1912, page 10

St Andrew’s Society Ball

 

From a spectacular point of view St Andrew’s Ball last night surpassed all previous years.  Windsor Hall was literally transformed into a fairyland, and this achievement was largely due to the simplicity of color scheme in the interior decorations of the hall.  The delicate shades of green on white made a most unique and effective setting for the oriental splendour of the various colored gowns and headdresses.  Though the decorations of the ballroom might be called simple, on account of the elimination of colour, there was a grandeur of design which gave the whole scene a most luxurious appearance.

The hall was perfect representation of a Roman grape arbour, formed by arches of numerous columns of pure white, which were artistically draped with delicate strands of smilax and laurel. From the top of each pillar Laurel streamers ran in profusion, in the centre of room, forming a large canopy.  The centrepiece was a magnificent circular brooch of light, holding a shower of Southern smilax and Vinela, while thousands of small strands of evergreen fan up and were lost in the massive laurel canopy.

Behind the white columns, which ran completely around the room, there were heavy embankments of ferns, and palms.  Dimly the [illegible] woodwork of the walls could be seen through Laurel streamers of smaller dimensions running from the green embankment to the roof of the beautifully festooned arbour.  A soft lighting effect added greatly to the scene and assisted materially in the blending of a thousand colors.

The stage was allotted to the orchestra and was beautifully festooned in tall graceful palms rising from a bank of ferns.

Scottish Societies List – updated

I have had a lot of responses for assistance for the creation of a list of Scottish societies (of all types) dating from the start of settlement in Canada to the present.  I am up to 120 societies – but I am sure there are more, please keep the suggestions coming.

Thank you so very much for those who have already helped!  So appreciated.

 

Here is the updated list:

City Name Start Date End Date Notes
Halifax North British Society 1768 Now known as the Scots Society
Saint John St Andrew’s Society 1798 Still exists
Williamstown Highland Society of Canada 1818 1857 Ceased 1828 and reformed 1843
Fredericton Society of St Andrew’s 1825 ?
Montreal St Andrew’s Society 1835 Still Exists
Toronto St Andrew’s Society 1836 Still exists
Quebec City St Andrew’s Society 1837 Unknown – but no longer exists
Kingston Kingston and Midland District St Andrew’s Society 1840 ?
Miramachi Highland society of New Brunswick 1842 Still exists
Quebec Highland Society of Canada – Quebec 1843 1857
Montreal Highland Society of Canada – Montreal 1843 1857
Kingston Highland Socieyt of Canada – Kingston 1843 1857
Toronto Highland Society of Canada – Toronto 1843 1857
Niagara Highland Society of Canada – Niagara 1843 1857
Hamilton Highland Society of Canada – Hamilton 1843 1857
Amherstburg Highland Society of Canada – Amherstburg 1843 1857
Bytown [Ottawa] Highland Society of Canada – Bytown 1843 1857
Johnstown Highland Society of Canada – Johnstown 1843 1857
Goderich Highland Society of Canada – Goderich 1843 1857
Perth Highland Society of Canada – Perth 1843 1857
Ottawa St Andrew’s Society 1847 Still exists
Montreal Caledonian Society of Montreal 1855 1970 -ish
Embro Embro Highland Society 1856 1888
Hamilton Burns Club 1858 ?
Williamstown Caledonian Society of Glengarry 1858
Victoria St Andrew and Caledonian Society 1859 2014
Montreal Burns Club 1859 ?
Halifax Caledonian Club 1861 ?
Antigonish Antigonish Highland Society 1861 ?
Prince Edward Island Caledonian Club of Prince Edward Island 1864 Still exists
Petrolia St Andrews Society 1870 Still exists
Winnipeg St Andrew’s Society 1871 Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 1 Robert Burns 1876
Toronto Gaelic Society of Toronto (Comunn Gaidlhig Thoronto) 1880 http://www.cassoc.ca/frameset.htm
Calgary St Andrew – Caledonian Society of Calgary 1884 Still Exists
Vancouver St Andrew and Caledonian Society 1886 ?
Peterborough St Andrew’s Society 1887 ?
Restigouche Caledonian Society 1898 Still exists
Toronto Burns Literary Society of Toronto 1901 ?
Winnipeg Burns Club 1907 Still exists
Vancouver Gaelic Society of Vancouver 1908 Still exists http://www.vancouvergaelic.com/
Clan Logan society International 1913 http://www.clanlogansociety.com/
Toronto Cairngorm club 1921
Victoria Burns Club 1922 ?
Glengarry Clan MacLeod Society of Glengarry 1936 http://www.clanmacleod-canada.com/MacLeod.html
Embro Zorra Caledonian Society 1937 Still exists
Canada Clan Macpherson Association 1948 http://www.clan-macpherson.org/canada/
Canada Clan Ross Association of Canada 1960 http://www.greatclanross.org/
Calgary Calgary Burns Club 1964 Still exists
Clan MacDougall Society of North America 1965 http://macdougall.org/
Ontario Scots Federation of Ontario 1965
Vancouver United Scottish Cultural society 1966 Still exists http://scottishculturalcentre.com/uscsociety/
Vancouver Royal scottish Country Dance Society 1966 Still exists http://www.rscdsvancouver.org/
Ontario Clan Cameron 1966 http://www.camerons-ontario.org/Ontario%20Branch%20History%202008%20Main%20Body%20Dec%2008.pdf
Kingston Royal Scottish Country Dance Society 1967 Still exists first called St Andrew’s Scottish Country Dance Society
Canada Clan Hunter Canada 1970 http://clanhuntercanada.weebly.com/
Canada Clan Sinclair Association Canada 1972 http://www.clansinclair.ca/docs/history.htm#presidents
Canada Clan Graham Society 1975
Canada Clan MacLeod Societies of Canada 1975 http://www.clanmacleod-canada.com/
Canada Clan Munro Association of Canada 1975 http://www.clanmunroassociation.ca/frameset.htm
Canada Clans and Scottish Societies of Canada 1976 http://www.cassoc.ca/frameset.htm
Canada Elliot Clan society 1977 http://www.elliotclan.com/history/
Canada Clan MacLennan Canada 1978 http://www.clanmaclennan.ca/
New Brunswick Scottish Cultural Association of New Brunswick 1980 Still exists
Nova Scotia Clan Cameron 1980 http://www.clan-cameron.org/n-america/map.html
Canada Clan Macfie Society 1981 http://www.clanmacfie.co.uk/
North America Robert Burns Association of North America 1982 Still exists Based in Hamilton, ON
Canada Clan Lamont society of Canada 1986 http://www.clanlamont.ca/
Canada Clan Mackenzie Society of Canada 1986 http://www.clanmackenziecanada.ca/
Halifax Burns Club 1997 Still exists
Ontario Clan Donnachaidh society 1997 http://www.cassoc.ca/clans/donnachaidh/frameset.htm
Highland Prairie (AB, BC, MB, SK) Clan Cameron 2002 http://www.clan-cameron.org/n-america/map.html
Medicine Hat Medicine Hat Burns Club 2008 Still exists
Ottawa Scottish Society 2012 Still exists
Pictou St Andrew’s Society ? Still exists
Canada Clan Gregor Society ? http://www.clangregor.com/faq/
Edmonton St Andrew’s Society <1894 ?
London St Andrew’s Society <1902 ?
Montreal Ayrshire Society <1929 Still exists
Amherst St Andrew’s Society <1959 ?
Scarborough Caledonian society of Scarborough <1976
Ontario Highland Dancers Association <1976
Toronto Toronto Scottish Regimental Association <1976
Eastern Canada Highland Dancers Association <1976
Uist and Barra Scots Association <1976
Daughters of Scotland <1976
Timmins St Andrew’s Society <1982 ?
Canada Clan Watson Association of Canada 1980s http://www.cassoc.ca/clans/watson/frameset.htm
Quebec Quebec Thistle Council 2016
Annapolis Burns Club of Annapolis Still exists
Toronto Robert Burns Club of Toronto Still exists
Edmonton Edmonton Scottish Society Still exists
Montreal Sons of Scotland Still exists
Montreal Thistle Society Still exists
Chilliwack Sons of Scotland – 220 Fraser Glen Still exists
New Westminster Sons of Scotland – 191 Lord of the Isles Still exists
Winnipeg Sons of Scotland – 126 Melrose Still exists
Montreal Sons of Scotland – 76 Mount Stephen Still exists
Ottawa Sons of Scotland – 26 Argyle Still exists
Vancouver Sons of Scotland – 209 Lord Tweedsmuir Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 5 Dunedin Still exists
Verdun Sons of Scotland – 94 McKenzie Still exists
Vancouver Sons of Scotland – 212 Glengarry Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 6 Bellahouston Still exists
Regina Sons of Scotland – 177 Balmoral Still exists
Vernon Sons of Scotland – 166 Kildonan Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 104 Cameron Still exists
Victoria Sons of Scotland – 204 Balgownie Still exists
Vancouver Burns Club
Edmonton Burns Club
London West Elgin Caledonian Society
Canada Clan Chisolm society http://www.clanchisholmsociety.org/public/CANindex.php
Clan Irwin Association http://www.cassoc.ca/clans/irwin/underconst.htm
Ontario Clan Kincaid http://www.clankincaid.org/Constitution
Canada Clan Mackay Association of Canada http://www.clanmackay.ca/
Canada Clan MacNeil http://www.clanmacneilincanada.ca/about/past-chiefs-of-barra/
Belleville Belleville Scottish Country Dance Society Still exists
Brockville Brockville Scottish Country Dance Society Still exists
Prince Edward County Prince Edward County Scottish Country Dance Society Still Exists
Portsmouth Portsmouth Village Dancers Still Exists

Historic List of Scottish Societies in Canada – Assistance please!

I am trying to create a list of all the Scottish societies which have been founded in Canada since the beginning of Scottish settlement here in order to view trends etc.

I have below a partial list of societies which I have knowledge of, their names, location, and dates of existence.  If anyone can assist me with this it would be appreciated.

I will update the list as I receive more information, and do more research.

List of Scottish Societies in Canada through time

[Draft Updated! – Work in Progress]

City Name Start Date End Date Notes
Halifax North British Society 1768 Now known as the Scots Society
Saint John St Andrew’s Society 1798 Still exists
Fredericton Society of St Andrew’s 1825 ?
Montreal St Andrew’s Society 1835 Still Exists
Toronto St Andrew’s Society 1836 Still exists
Quebec City St Andrew’s Society 1837 Unknown – but no longer exists
Kingston Kingston and Midland District St Andrew’s Society 1840 ?
Ottawa St Andrew’s Society 1847 Still exists
Montreal Caledonian Society of Montreal 1855 1970 -ish
Embro Embro Highland Society 1856 1888
Hamilton Burns Club 1858 ?
Victoria St Andrew and Caledonian Society 1859 2014
Montreal Burns Club 1859 ?
Halifax Caledonian Club 1861 ?
Prince Edward Island Caledonian Club of Prince Edward Island 1864 Still exists
Petrolia St Andrews Society 1870 Still exists
Winnipeg St Andrew’s Society 1871 Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 1 Robert Burns 1876
Toronto Gaelic Society of Toronto (Comunn Gaidlhig Thoronto) 1880 http://www.cassoc.ca/frameset.htm
Calgary St Andrew – Caledonian Society of Calgary 1884 Still Exists
Vancouver St Andrew and Caledonian Society 1886 ?
Peterborough St Andrew’s Society 1887 ?
Restigouche Caledonian Society 1898 Still exists
Toronto Burns Literary Society of Toronto 1901 ?
Winnipeg Burns Club 1907 Still exists
Vancouver Gaelic Society of Vancouver 1908 Still exists http://www.vancouvergaelic.com/
Clan Logan society International 1913 http://www.clanlogansociety.com/
Toronto Cairngorm club 1921
Victoria Burns Club 1922 ?
Glengarry Clan MacLeod Society of Glengarry 1936 http://www.clanmacleod-canada.com/MacLeod.html
Embro Zorra Caledonian Society 1937 Still exists
Canada Clan Macpherson Association 1948 http://www.clan-macpherson.org/canada/
Canada Clan Ross Association of Canada 1960 http://www.greatclanross.org/
Calgary Calgary Burns Club 1964 Still exists
Clan MacDougall Society of North America 1965 http://macdougall.org/
Ontario Scots Federation of Ontario 1965
Vancouver United Scottish Cultural society 1966 Still exists http://scottishculturalcentre.com/uscsociety/
Vancouver Royal scottish Country Dance Society 1966 Still exists http://www.rscdsvancouver.org/
Ontario Clan Cameron 1966 http://www.camerons-ontario.org/Ontario%20Branch%20History%202008%20Main%20Body%20Dec%2008.pdf
Canada Clan Hunter Canada 1970 http://clanhuntercanada.weebly.com/
Canada Clan Sinclair Association Canada 1972 http://www.clansinclair.ca/docs/history.htm#presidents
Canada Clan Graham Society 1975
Canada Clan MacLeod Societies of Canada 1975 http://www.clanmacleod-canada.com/
Canada Clan Munro Association of Canada 1975 http://www.clanmunroassociation.ca/frameset.htm
Canada Clans and Scottish Societies of Canada 1976 http://www.cassoc.ca/frameset.htm
Canada Elliot Clan society 1977 http://www.elliotclan.com/history/
Canada Clan MacLennan Canada 1978 http://www.clanmaclennan.ca/
New Brunswick Scottish Cultural Association of New Brunswick 1980 Still exists
Nova Scotia Clan Cameron 1980 http://www.clan-cameron.org/n-america/map.html
Canada Clan Macfie Society 1981 http://www.clanmacfie.co.uk/
North America Robert Burns Association of North America 1982 Still exists Based in Hamilton, ON
Canada Clan Lamont society of Canada 1986 http://www.clanlamont.ca/
Canada Clan Mackenzie Society of Canada 1986 http://www.clanmackenziecanada.ca/
Halifax Burns Club 1997 Still exists
Ontario Clan Donnachaidh society 1997 http://www.cassoc.ca/clans/donnachaidh/frameset.htm
Highland Prairie (AB, BC, MB, SK) Clan Cameron 2002 http://www.clan-cameron.org/n-america/map.html
Medicine Hat Medicine Hat Burns Club 2008 Still exists
Ottawa Scottish Society 2012 Still exists
Pictou St Andrew’s Society ? Still exists
Canada Clan Gregor Society ? http://www.clangregor.com/faq/
Edmonton St Andrew’s Society <1894 ?
London St Andrew’s Society <1902 ?
Montreal Ayrshire Society <1929 Still exists
Amherst St Andrew’s Society <1959 ?
Scarborough Caledonian society of Scarborough <1976
Ontario Highland Dancers Association <1976
Toronto Toronto Scottish Regimental Association <1976
Eastern Canada Highland Dancers Association <1976
Uist and Barra Scots Association <1976
Daughters of Scotland <1976
Timmins St Andrew’s Society <1982 ?
Canada Clan Watson Association of Canada 1980s http://www.cassoc.ca/clans/watson/frameset.htm
Quebec Quebec Thistle Council 2016
Annapolis Burns Club of Annapolis Still exists
Toronto Robert Burns Club of Toronto Still exists
Edmonton Edmonton Scottish Society Still exists
Montreal Sons of Scotland Still exists
Montreal Thistle Society Still exists
Chilliwack Sons of Scotland – 220 Fraser Glen Still exists
New Westminster Sons of Scotland – 191 Lord of the Isles Still exists
Winnipeg Sons of Scotland – 126 Melrose Still exists
Montreal Sons of Scotland – 76 Mount Stephen Still exists
Ottawa Sons of Scotland – 26 Argyle Still exists
Vancouver Sons of Scotland – 209 Lord Tweedsmuir Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 5 Dunedin Still exists
Verdun Sons of Scotland – 94 McKenzie Still exists
Vancouver Sons of Scotland – 212 Glengarry Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 6 Bellahouston Still exists
Regina Sons of Scotland – 177 Balmoral Still exists
Vernon Sons of Scotland – 166 Kildonan Still exists
Toronto Sons of Scotland – 104 Cameron Still exists
Victoria Sons of Scotland – 204 Balgownie Still exists
Vancouver Burns Club
Edmonton Burns Club
London West Elgin Caledonian Society
Canada Clan Chisolm society http://www.clanchisholmsociety.org/public/CANindex.php
Clan Irwin Association http://www.cassoc.ca/clans/irwin/underconst.htm
Ontario Clan Kincaid http://www.clankincaid.org/Constitution
Canada Clan Mackay Association of Canada http://www.clanmackay.ca/
Canada Clan MacNeil http://www.clanmacneilincanada.ca/about/past-chiefs-of-barra/
3ds30nov1912
Montreal Daily Star, 30 November 1912, page 3

Caledonian Games, Montreal, 1880

Montreal Gazette 23 September 1880 page 2

The Caledonian Games

The Caledonian Society to the [illegible] Annual gathering and athletic sports- His Excellency on the ground.

When the Citizens’ Committee decided to aid the Caledonian Society, it took a wise step, for no greater attraction could have been offered to our visitors than the programme of sports arranged by the Caledonian Society.  In the early portion of the day the attendance was small, and when the games were begun the prospects were rather depressing.  Shortly after 2 o’clock, however, the grounds began to fill up, and the ticket-takers were kept busy until about 4 o’clock, when there must have been about four thousand people on the field.  About a quarter past twelve, His Excellency the Governor-General, accompanied by Capt Chater, ADU, arrived on the grounds, where he was received by the President, Mr Robin, and conducted to a pavilion erected for his reception Mr Robin, on behalf of the Society , presented to him a beautifully bound volume of the constitution and by-laws, the title page of which was handsomely illuminated, and on the second page was a certificate of membership, which was read by Mr John Hood, the Secretary.

His Excellency was pleased to accept the volume, and briefly replied to the remarks of President Robin.  He always had taken an interest in athletic sports, and commended the desire of the Society to encourage the development of physical strength.  He regretted the absence from the programme of broadsword and single stick exercises which were highly popular in Scotland, and hoped they might shortly be introduced.

Miss Mary Fulton, a little daughter of Mr P Fulton, then presented a beautiful bouquet, for which his Excellency thanked the fair donor.

The following gentlemen acted as judges in the various competitions:- Lt Col John Fletcher, CMG; Dr McEachran, FRCVS; Angus Grant, Wm Angus, Alex McGibbon, Ewan McLennan, David Mair, Hugh McKinnon, Wm Wilson & Duncan E Bowie, Esquires.

On the ground appeared some of the most noted athletes on the continent, included DC Ross, of Philadelphia, EW Johnston, of Hamilton, William Robertson of New York, John Raine and George Irvine of Ottawa, and others.

The competitions were entered into with zest, and as a result the interest excited among the spectators was great. The dancing was especially good.  Mr Henderson, of Toronto, in the Highland Fling, rousing the enthusiasm of his Scottish audience to such a pitch that rounds of cheers and excited cries greeted the conclusion of his performance.  In the Ghillie Callum (sword dance) Montreal stood to the front, but altogether so excellent was the display that the task of discriminating must have been one of no small difficulty. The committee of arrangements are to be congratulated on the manner in which the programme was carried out, event following event without unnecessary delay and the whole being completed at a quarter before six.

The scene from the pavilion was a very pretty one, the picturesque costumes of the competitors, guests in Highland dress mingling with the more sombre tints of our modern habiliments, which were in turn relieved by the fluttering ribbons and many-colored shades of ladies dresses, forming a tout ensemble witnessed only at a Scottish gathering. Want of space prevents a detailed account of the games we publish the following:

List of Prizes

Quoits- 1st R Waugh, Point St Charles; 2nd A Tattersall, Point St Charles; 3rd W Todd.

Dambrod Match – 1st Alex Brodie; 2nd Thomas Finn.

Bowling Green Match – 1st J Shartris; 2nd Peter Fulton. Prizes for this match were presented by the President.

Throwing Heavy Hammer – DC Ross, Philadelphia, 1st 97 ft 10 in; D Smith Lucknow Ont 2nd, 92 ft 6 in; M MacDonald 3rd 87 ft 8 in.

Throwing Light Hammer – DC Ross, 1st 116 ft 9 in; D Smith 2nd, 111 ft 5 in; M MacDonald 106 ft 11 in.

Putting Heavy Stone- AA Macdonald Lochgarrry, 1st 35 ft 3 in; DC Ross, 2nd 34 ft 1 ½ in; W Robertson New York, 32 ft 11 in.

Putting Light Stone – AA Macdonald, 1st 45ft 8 in; DC Ross 2nd 42 ft 7 in; W Robertson, 3rd 40ft

Tossing the Caber- D Smith 1st, 38 ft 10 ½ in; DC Ross 2nd 37 ft 10 in.

Running hop, step, and jump – Thomas Aitkin, New York, 1st 44 ft; M Macdonald 2nd, 43 ft 2 ½ in; Alex Miller, Montreal 3rd, 43 ft 10 ½ in.

Running high leap- EW Johnson 1st, 5 ft 4 in; Wm Robertson 2nd 5 ft 4 in; AC Reid, 3rd 5 ft 2 in.

Running long jump – Thos Aitkin, 1st 21 ft 1 ½ in; AC Reid 2nd 19 ft 6 in; EW Johnson 3rd 18 ft 6 in.

Standing long jump- EW Johnson 1st 10 ft 9 ½ in; M Macdonald 2nd 10 ft; J Newton 3rd 9ft 9 in.

Standing high leap – EW Johnson, 1st 4ft 8 in; M Macdonald 2nd 4ft 7 in, DC Ross 4 ft 6 in.

Vaulting with pole – Thomas Aitken, 1st 9 ft 4 in; Wm Robertson 2nd 8 ft 10 in; Alex Miller and John Anderson equal 8 ft 4 in, divide 3rd prize.

Pony race- Thomas Irving’s “Rosebud”; 2nd, J Irving’s “Minnie”; 3rd Douglas Lorne McGibbon’s “Princess Louise.”

 

Caledonian Society Concert, Montreal, 1919

Montreal Gazette, 3 November 1919, page 11

Caledonian Sc’y Annual Concert

Program was one of the finest and most successful

There was a great gathering of the clans at the Windsor Hall on Saturday night, when the Caledonian Society of Montreal held its 64th Annual Hallowe’en Concert, Scots from the hills of Auld Scotia and Scottish-Canadians of the second, third and fourth generations were alike enthusiastic in their celebration of one of the great traditional festivals of the land of the heather.

Bagpipes skirled, tartans fluttered, dancers “lap and flang” the fiddle “thirled the heart-strings,” and singers thundered out the defiant old war songs of Highlands and Lowlands. It was a “braw Scotch nicht” and many old timers declared the concert to be the best ever given by the Caledonian Society.

James A Greig, president of the society, was chairman, and others were present, as guests of the Caledonians, representatives of the St George’s, St David’s Welsh, St Patrick’s and the Irish Protestant Benevolent societies.  A message from Admiral Halsey, on behalf of the Prince of Wales was read, regretting that a previous engagement prevented His Royal Highness from being present.

Those who supplied the program were: Soprano Mrs Harold Mills; contralto Miss Very McLean; tenor James Elcho Fiddes; baritone Ruthven MacDonald; violinist Miss Ruth Pryce; elocutionist TH Alston; Highland dancer William Rae; the Glengarry Pipe Band; the Caledonian Juvenile Dancers; accompanist JH Shearer ARCM, ARCO.

In the first part, the Glengarry Pipe Band, under Major JA Stewart, led off with a great blast, and the Caledonian Juvenile Dancers, Misses Wilhemina Carmichael, Violet Arnott, and Masters Robert Baxter and Geo Rae, executed a Scotch reel in admirable style. Ruthven MacDonald sang the old war song.  “The Standard on the Braes O’Mar” and had to come back, when he gave “I’ve a Lass Amang the Heather,” a song of the Scottish soldier of today, Miss Pryce pleased with a violin solo – (a) “Melodrame de Piccolina” and (b) “Rondino”.  Mrs Mills sang “My ain wee hoose” and as an encore gave Burns’s song about himself, “There was a lad was born in Kyle.” Mr Alston recited “the Whustle o’ Randy McGraw,” a war piece, and as an encore gave another, “ A lay of Neuve Chapelle”.  Miss Very McLean gave a splendid rendering of “O sing tae me the Auld Scots Bangs” and was equally effective with her encore “Annie Laurie”.  Mr Rae danced the Ghillie Callum in the real old way.  Mr Fidden, in Highland dress, captured the house with “Macgregor’s Gathering,” and responded with a Burns gem not often heard here, “The lad a Ballochmyle.”

In the second part, the Glengarry Pipe Band led off again.  Mr MacDonald triumphed with “Scotland Yet,” and as an encore he and Mrs Millie gave a fine interpretation of “The Crookeit Bawbee.”  Miss Bryce’s violin solo, (a) “A Scotch Melodie” (b) Tambourin Chinois,” was so good that she was called back, and made her fiddle speak in that wonderful old melody of the Scottish borderland, “The flowers o’ the forest.” Mrs M[illegible] sant Burns’s humorous old love song, “O whustle an’ I’ll come tae ye my lad” with true richness.  In a humorous recitation of Scottish village life, “the deputation” Mr Alston made the house rock with laughter.  Miss Mclean, this time in Highland dress, triumphed with Lady Nairne’s war song, “W’a hundred pipers,” and the encore was a real treat – Miss McLean and Mr Fiddes in “Huntingtower,” or “When ye gang awa, Jamie.” Mr Fiddes” last song was “The Battle of Stirling” and it thrilled.  Mr Rae danced the Sailor’s Hornpipe in fine style.  “Auld Lang Syne” and “God Save the King” and a splendid selection by the Glengarry Pipe Band brought the entertainment to a close.

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