Montreal Standard, 8 March 1919, page 10

Tested Kitchenette Equipment

For the batchelor girl, especially the one who wants comfort and cleanliness in cooking in her tiny kitchenette, and at the same time wishes to spend very little money, the proper tools are needed. The Standard Institute  has tested out scores of appliances of all sorts, sizes and prices adapted for this use, and this service is “At Your Service,” if individual housekeeping is your lot in life. The appliances can be easily adapted for two, and a good meal can be bought for the coin you give the waiter, which leaves a margin on the daily food budget for savings, recreation, or the patronising of better classes when you are too tired or hurried to be your own chef.

If you have not got an electric coffee pot or urn, then one of the perculating pots that can sit on the small electric heater will be found very suitable, especially if not too large to heat up quickly.

Either an electric chafing dish with an extra pan or too [sic] for its serviceable electric that it might be used, or the three-storied grill shewn in the picture, which permits of toasting, baking, poaching or even frying, all on the one tiny stove.  Even delectable corn pone or muffins may be baked in the little tin when placed over the coil and covered with one of the other pans. The pan can be uncovered and slipped beneath the heat – for browning when the bread is done.

The toaster shown is the king of toasters, because it automatically reverses the bread – no futile dabs be being made at the hot slice with the fingers. On letting down the side the toast accommodatingly slides down and turns itself.

If tea is wanted instead of coffee there is a most convenient tea infuser, which is merely a large teaspoon with a perforated top, and is just the thing for the solitary drinker of tea.

If the bachelor girl aspires to the last word in economy, and is enterprising enough to put up her lunch instead of buying it, there is a scholarly lunch box of distinguished appearance that will collaborate with her.  Besides the tincase for sandwiches, fruit and cake, there is a thermos bottle to keep soup, chocolate, tea or coffee hot, or lemonade, tea or milk cold, as season or taste may dictate. The thermos bottle idea relieves the “carried luncheon” from the usual criticism.  There is nothing dry or unattractive about such a luncheon with an appetising hot or cold liquid accompaniment. And there is much more relaxation in eating such a meal quietly, with a magazine or book for company, than in seeking it amid the clamor and rush of the average lunch room that a girl with a salary of $15 a week can afford.10stan8mar1919