Montreal Standard, 12 January 1907, page 11

Does Your Boy Smoke?

11sta12jan1907a

The boys of our country are being poisoned by cigarettes. The habit is fastening itself upon thousands of mere children. Who is there who has not seen hundreds of smoking boys not yet in their teens? Mere children marching forward to depravity. Who of those who have watched has not seen the child smoker slide down the moral grade and quickly take on those other accomplishments that are characteristic of the blackguard?

Moderate smoking among men may be harmless but children who smoke are doomed in health and morals. In ninety-nine cases out of a hundred the child smoker becomes degenerate. A child who smokes never becomes a man. He develops into a human weed. The child who smokes is on his way to a premature grave; he may be on his way to the penitentiary; he cannot be on his way to a successful career. A child who smokes probably swears and lies and to all intents and purposes has already joined the criminal classes.

No matter whose darling he may have been, the physical and moral ruin of the child smoker is being effected. A ruined boy cannot grow up to be a good citizen. Every man who has ended his career on the gallows was once an innocent child. There is not a decent minded smoking man in all Christendom who approves of the child smoker. Mothers little dream of the surreptitious smoking of the day by tots of boys who cannot appreciate their danger. Do you want to save your boys?

The Standard has set itself the task of saving thirty thousand boys by reclaiming fifteen thousand child smokers and by dissuading fifteen thousand from ever forming the habit.

The Standard will, in due course, unfold its plan, and put it into execution. It will require money and patient work to do this.

The Standard will supply the money and pay for the work. . .

The Standard knows there is no such word as fail in this task.

The result will prove whether or not The Standard has set itself an impossible undertaking.

The Standard is now going into nearly every English reading home in Montreal. There are whole streets, and whole sections – each embracing many streets – where, from one end of it to the other, scarcely a house can be found where
the Standard is not read.

The Standard is in touch with the people.

For many weeks the demand for each issue of The Standard has increased on the previous issue, so that its
circulation is counted now not by hundreds, not by thousands, but by tens of thousands, and has now a total bona fide circulation achieved in one year greater than any other paper in Canada ever achieved in five years, and with a total larger in the City of Montreal than any other English paper bar only one.

George Murray Publishing Company, Ltd.

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